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ORL – Head and Neck Nursing

Table of Contents
Winter 2006 / Volume 24, Number 1

 

Feature


Recovery Issues for African Americans

Following Treatment for Oral Cavity/Pharynx Cancer

Mary Jo Dropkin, PhD, RN, Carol Magai, PhD, & Tracey M. Ungar, PhD

 

 

Departments

 

Editorial: Music to the Manager’s Ear

Susan F. Rudy, MSN, CRNP, CORLN

 

Presidential Perspectives: Preview of 2006

Hope Andresen, RN, CORLN

 

Product of Interest

Department Editor: Cynthia Tucker, BA, RN, RNFA, CNOR, CORLN

 

Practice Management: CPT® Coding for Upper Airway Endoscopies

Mary LeGrand, RN, MA, CPC, CCS-P

 

Media Review: Commercial Otorhinolaryngology Patient Education Booklets

Linda K. Clarke, MS, RN, CORLN

 



Recovery Issues for African Americans

Following Treatment for Oral Cavity/Pharynx Cancer

Mary Jo Dropkin, PhD, RN, Carol Magai, PhD, & Tracey M. Ungar, PhD

 

Despite the high incidence of oral cavity/pharynx cancer (OCPC) in African Americans, there is little scientific evidence to date that describes the recovery process following treatment of OCPC in this population. Ethnic differences in an array of psychosocial factors, such as emotional regulation styles and social networks, may influence the recovery course with different morbidities and mortality than European Americans. This paper provides an overview of the current literature pertaining to recovery from treatment of OCPC in the African American population.

 

 


 

ORL – Head and Neck Nursing

Table of Contents
Spring 2006 / Volume 24, Number 2

 

Feature

 

Introduction to Genetics for Otorhinolaryngology Nurses

Kirsten J. Malone, BA, BS, RN & Sarah Sheets Cook, DrNP

 

 

Departments

 

Editorial: Opportunities and Responsibilities for Nurses in the Genomic Era

Susan F. Rudy, MSN, CRNP, CORLN

 

Of Specialty Interest: The Key to the Human Pedigree

Susan F. Rudy, MSN, CRNP, CORLN

 

Spotlight on Research

Editor: Helene J. Krouse, PhD, APRN, BC, CORLN, FAAN

Reviewer: Mary A. Reichert, BA, RN, CORLN

 

Media Review: Resources for Learning More About Genetics

Editor: Linda K. Clarke, MS, RN, CORLN

Reviewers:

Shannon P. Pryor, MD

Kirsten J. Malone, BA, BS, RN

Sarah Sheets Cook, DrNP

 


 

Introduction to Genetics for Otorhinolaryngology Nurses

Kirsten J. Malone, BA, BS, RN & Sarah Sheets Cook, DrNP

 

With recent advances in human genetics, clinical genetics can no longer be thought of only in terms of rare disorders; rather, clinical genetics more broadly concerns human variation and potential. Genetic conditions of the head and neck merit special attention because they are so visible, affecting body image as well as breathing, eating, and communicating. Although conditions in this article may seem rare and severe, they provide good models for understanding genetic disorders.

 

 


 

ORL – Head and Neck Nursing

Table of Contents
Summer 2006 / Volume 24, Number 3

 

Feature

 

An Overview of Current Techniques for Tonsillectomy

Karen Baker, MSN, RN

 

 

Departments

 

Guest Editorial: Competence in the Field of Aging within

Otorhinolaryngology and Head-Neck Nursing

Sarah H. Kagan, PhD, RN, AOCN®

Helene J. Krouse, PhD, APRN, BC, CORLN, FAAN

Ann P. Luther, APRN, BC, CORLN

 

Leadership and Professional Perspectives in ORL Nursing: Mentoring Future Leaders: The Midwinter SOHN Board Meeting Guest Attendee Program

Editor: Joan Such Lockhart, PhD, RN, CORLN, AOCN®, FAAN

Author: Patricia Zarnitz RN, MSN, RNFA, CRNP, BC

 

Patient Education: Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients

 

Highlights from the Hill: Social Security: Does It Have a Future?

Linda Miller Calandra, MSN, RN, CPNP, CORLN

 

Products of Interest: Products for Managing Neck Fistulas

Katherine Zimnicki, RN, MSN-CS, CWOCN

 

Products of Interest: Portex Tracheostomy Product Recall Medications NOT to Crush

Media Review: Gerontology Books

Editor: Linda K. Clarke, MS, RN, CORLN

Reviewers:

Mary Nouvertne Klein, RN, MSN, LNFA

Maya N. Clark BSN, RN

 


 

An Overview of Current Techniques for Tonsillectomy

Karen Baker, MSN, RN

 

The scope of this article is to familiarize the reader with the newest technological advances for tonsil surgery, including a brief overview of the surgical indications and potential complications. A review of current literature comparing various techniques is provided. These techniques are applicable to all patients, regardless of age. Not all technologies are indicated for infectious tonsillitis. For instance, radiofrequency ablation is indicated only for reducing the size of obstructing tonsils. The patient’s condition and medical history guide the surgeon in selecting the best method, as well as the timing of surgery. It is important to remember that most tonsillectomies are not performed to save a life, but rather to improve the quality of life.

 

 


 

ORL – Head and Neck Nursing

Table of Contents
Fall 2006 / Volume 24, Number 4

 

Feature

 

Smoking Among Patients Who Have Head and Neck Cancer: What Can Nurses Do?

Lena Sharp, RN, PhD

 

 

Departments

 

Editorial: Staying Motivated in Providing Tobacco Cessation Advice and Counseling

Susan F. Rudy, MSN, CS-FNP, CORLN

 

Spotlight on Research: Tobacco Dependence Curricula in U.S. Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Education

Editor: Helene J. Krouse, PhD, APRN, BC, CORLN, FAAN

Reviewer: Jan Adams, BSN, MPA, CNA, CORLN

 

Patient Education: Varenicline (Chantix™): A Stop-Smoking Pill

 

Highlights from the Hill: The State Tobacco Settlement: Where Do We Stand?

Linda K. Clarke, MS, RN, CORLN

 

Practice Management: Coding and Insurance Coverage for

Tobacco Cessation Services

Mary LeGrand, RN, MA, CCS-P, CPC

Susan F. Rudy, MSN, CS-FNP, CORLN

 

Of Specialty Interest: Influences on Youth and Young Adolescent Quitting

Youth Tobacco Cessation Collaborative

 

Media Review: New Head and Neck Cancer Text

Reviewer: Ann Luther, MSN, APRN, BC, CORLN

 


 

Smoking Among Patients Who Have Head and Neck Cancer: What Can Nurses Do?

Lena Sharp, RN, PhD

Smoking is a major risk factor for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Many patients continue to smoke after diagnosis and treatment, even though smoking is associated with an increased treatment morbidity and a poor prognosis. This paper provides an overview of evidence-based smoking cessation strategies for patients who have H&N cancer and focuses on how nurses in different care settings can intervene. The Karolinska H ospital experience is highlighted.